Develop Your Communication and Interpersonal Skills


Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home/ltkyinfo/portalangolaoffshore.eu.org/wp-content/plugins/website-monetization-by-magenet/monetization-by-magenet.php on line 139

The American Management Association offers three day seminars in cities like Chicago, San Francisco, Washington D.C. and New York to aid those entering the labor market to develop their communication and interpersonal skills. The seminars are geared to IT or Information Technologies people and technical professionals. Actually what this means is that these seminars are geared for those individuals working professionals in computer and other technologies whose professional skills have been developed but whose relationship skills may lack in people skills or the mindset to interact with people who may not have similar IT or technological training.

The cost for these seminars depends on whether you are a member of The American Management Association. The seminar costs 2, 195 dollars for non-members and 1,995 dollars for members. One of the benefits is that you can use the seminar to get continuing education university credits.

The seminar focuses on developing skills identification with the other person, active rather than passive listening skills and skills necessary to get your own message across to the other person. These seminars are for the professional in technology who has needed to develop the art of understanding other people’s needs and their perspective which may or may not be technology based. To debate with people of other disciplines and to come out the winner would be a key point focus for these seminars.

Colleges Fail to Turn Out Enough Computer and Information Technology Graduates

The computer and information technology field is one of today’s highest demand employment fields. The Federal Government projects an increase of 22% in the total number of jobs between now and 2020. The trend is expected to continue.

Industry experts say that private and public sector employers are searching for qualified people to work as web developers, security analysts, network administrators, computer support specialists and other specialized computer-related employment jobs.

College graduates with the skills and knowledge that are needed in information technology can have numerous job opportunities. The demand is widespread.

The fact remains, however, that colleges and universities in the United States are failing to prepare enough people to fill the vacancies. Evidence that employers are experiencing difficulty in finding qualified Americans to work in the computer-related occupations can be found in the continuing demand for H-1B visas for foreign workers.

The Brookings Institute reports that U.S. companies continue to face a shortage of available workers in the science and technology fields. Computer occupations remain among the job classifications for which H-1B visas are being sought. Brookings recommends that the Federal Government immediately adjust caps so that employment needs by region can be filled as soon as possible. The Institute further suggests that the fees charged to apply for H-1B visa applications be spent on programs that train U.S. workers in the high demand occupations that are currently being filled by workers from other countries.

Cisco, a major global networking company, confirms that the demand for qualified workers exceeds the supply. Jeanne Beliveau-Dunn, vice president and general manager of Learning at Cisco, recently said in a Forbes magazine article, “Absolutely, there is a skills gap in I.T. It’s where the jobs will be in the future.”

William Kamela, senior director for education and the workforce at Microsoft’s Law and Corporate Affairs Office, said “Nationally, there are about 40,000 computer science graduates a year but the nation needs 122,000.” Kazmela adds, “Microsoft can’t find enough people to fill all its positions.”

The demand for information technology workers is high and the compensation for computer technology workers is above average. Modern society and economies are literally driven by computer technology. Hundreds of thousands of information specialists are needed to make it work.

A serious disconnect appears to exist among employment demand, educational institutions and students. One educational leader says, “The educational system in the U.S. has failed to address employment demand. School administrators talk a good game but ignore reality. Existing undergraduate curriculum tends to be too broad. Students have to take the responsibility and inform themselves about career opportunities. Most schools avoid doing so. An individual who obtains the information technology skills and knowledge that are in demand can recession proof his or her future. The sky is the limit.”

The facts confirm that the U.S. has a shortage of qualified information technology workers. The demand for such workers is strong. Industry leaders continue to complain that qualified workers are difficult to find. Universities and colleges are failing to fill the demand. The job opportunities in information technology are abundant.

Evolution of Computers and Technology

When people began to count the numbers, they thought of devices which can track the numbers. The need for a device to do calculations along with emergence in commercialism and other human activities started the evolution of computers. Having the right tool to do calculations has always been significant for mankind. The Abacus may be the very first such device and it took hundreds of years to develop the Abacus to New digital computer. The first computer was created as an ordinary calculating machine in 19th century.

With the transit of time, many computing devices that include Napier bones and slide rule were invented. It took many centuries for the advent in computing devices. In 1642, a French mathematician, Blaise Pascal invented the very first operational automatic calculating machine. The brass rectangular box also known as Pascaline, used eight movable dials to add sum totals and eight digits only.

In 1694, German mathematician Gotfried Wilhemvoz Leibniz, extended Pascals design to do multiplication, division and also to find square root. This machine is referred to as stepped reckoner. The only drawback with this device is that it missed mechanically skillful precision in its structure and was not reliable.

The actual origin computing device is created by an English mathematician Charles Babbage in 1822. He proposed an engine to do difference equations, known as a difference engine. It could possibly print results automatically. Nevertheless, Babbage never quite made a fully functional difference engine, and in 1833, he stopped working on it at once.

In 1889, Herman Hollerith, also employed the Jacquards Loom concept to computing. One early success was the evolution of the ENIAC (Electronic Numeric Integrator and Calculator). After wards, EDVAC (Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer) was invented. It was first computer produced by John Von Neumann. In the year 1949, EDSAC (Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator) was developed by Maurice. Eckert-Mauchly Company invented UNIVAC (Universal Automatic computer) in 1951. In 1960, fastest electronic computer to access the time scale of 1 micro second and a total capacity of 100,000,000 words was evolved. During 1970s, the vogue for inexpensive computers made possible by integrated microchips (IC) and Microprocessors. These days utilizing VLSI (Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits), which are programmed using READ ONLY MEMORY is made. It could handle 32 bits at once, and can process 4,000,000 instructions at a stretch.

Beyond this level in computer history, many advances and changes have taken place, coming from the Apple-Microsoft wares, to the evolving of microcomputers and a variety of laptop or computer breakthroughs that have become an admitted part of our day to day lives. Without the initial steps of computer history, none of this probably would seem to be possible.

Kids and Computers – Merging Technology and Child Development

And while it is recognized that technology, particularly computers are not supposed to replace basic human interactions and relationships, many studies have been undertaken with respect to the role of technology in the social, cognitive and language abilities of the child. They have also been recognized as important tools that aid in the learning process and growth of the child.

Computers are used to enhance language development of the child through computer-based readings and materials that allow for more interaction on the part of the child-learner. Children find it easier to learn their alphabets with the aid of recorded voice pronunciations in the computer and interactive images and pictures that they can manipulate. Computer programs that allow for more manipulation and interaction have been found to make a contribution to the development of the child’s imagination, exploratory skills and logical thinking. As children are basically psychomotor learners and are attracted to visuals and colors, computer programs, the television and video discs have become essential tools in the delivery of the average pre-schooler’s lesson. Children exposed to computers were also found to have good eye-hand coordination.

Technology has been found to play a part in raising a child’s self-esteem and self-reliance. There is also evidence to suggest that using technology increased children’s confidence, comfort, and familiarity with technology at an early age. Similarly, children who were exposed to computers and technology-assisted instruction were found to be more work-focused and more productive compared to children who had not had this experience.

Technology now plays a crucial role in the development of children with learning disabilities. The use of hearing aids and computers have helped these children in word recognition, reading and writing because lessons can be programmed so that they are adaptable to the needs of the individual. In addition to this, the virtual, interactive world of the computer is now becoming a place for social interaction among children with language and speech disabilities.

In many respects technology has become the answer to the growing concern of psychologists about multiple intelligences and the different patterns of growth and development of the child. The use of technology and the computer mean that activities can be specially designed to address the needs and interests of children. The use of television and video discs have also broaden children’s knowledge of the world and their conceptual understanding of traditions and cultures other than their own.

Some people have complained that this is an ‘overuse’ of technology that could lead to negative effects such as the development of a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. However over exposure to the television or computers can easily be addressed with the use of proper guidelines and monitoring of use by parents and teachers. The maximum amount of screen time should be one to two hours a day for young children. Parents and teachers should still include a variety of physical activities and play in the course of a child’s day. Parents should take notice of, and monitor the software and programs that their children can use because not everything on the television or the internet is suitable for children.

We should not be too quick to discount the possibilities and opportunities technology can offer to the development of our children. These things have a role as learning tools but it should not be forgotten that in the child’s formation of his or her self the human role which facilitates more interaction on the part of the child learner is indispensable.

Computers and Technology in the Academic Learning of Young Children

In today’s world, computers have become a familiar fixture in the daily lives of children and adolescents, offering a wide range of learning and entertainment tools.

While surveys have indicated that boys are heavier users of computer games and visit websites more often than girls, no gender differences have emerged for chatting, using e-mail, or doing schoolwork on the computer. Additionally, both teenage boys and girls have expressed equal confidence in their computer skills.

On average, parents estimate that their school-age children and adolescents use the computer approximately 1.5 hours per day. Computers, electronic games and toys, and technology in general largely influence and affect the lives of children. Technology has thus proven to be largely capable of enriching the lives of children, especially in the areas of academic and social learning and development.

Computers for instance, can have rich cognitive and social benefits. Children as young as 3 years of age like computer activities and are capable of typing in simple commands on a standard keyboard. Additionally, in today’s classrooms, small groups often gather around the machine, and children more often collaborate while working with the computer instead of using traditional paper and pencil methods.

As soon as children start to become literate (being able to read and write), they can make use of the computer for word processing. This lets them write without struggling with handwriting, and they can revise text meanings and style, and check their spelling. As a result, children tend to worry less about making mistakes, and their written products end up longer and of higher quality.

Specially designed computer languages introduce children to programming skills. With the support of adults, children’s efforts with computer programming can lead to improved concept formation, problem solving and creativity. Furthermore, as children must detect errors in their programs to make them work, programming will assist them in reflecting on their though processes. This will inevitably lead to gains in meta-cognitive knowledge and self-regulation. Also, while programming, children are particularly likely to collaborate, persist in the face of challenge, and demonstrate positive attitudes toward learning. This is consistent with Vygotsky’s theory in showing that social interaction supporting children’s mastery of challenging computer tasks is capable of fostering a wide range of higher cognitive processes.

Children and adolescents spend much time using home computers purely for entertainment purposes. Many computer games emphasize speed and action in sometimes violent plots where children advance by shooting at and evading enemies. Children additionally play more complex exploratory and adventure games with themes of conquest and aggression and sports games. These include football and soccer. Children likewise enjoy simulation games, for example creating and caring for virtual pets (which require attention to “stay alive”), entering virtual realities (such as an ecosystem where the player mutates plants and animals into new species), and role-playing characters.

Speed-and-action computer games cultivate attentional and spatial skills in both boys and girls. However, while offering opportunities for learning, extensive playing of simulation games might risk blurring the distinction between virtual and real life.

Many youths use the computer to communicate. While using the internet causes some potential for causing disengagement from real life, it does hold much value in letting users acquire computer skills, information, and enabling communication.